Super Tuesday: The Birth Control Effect

[ 0 ] March 4, 2012 |

Super Tuesday offers more than 400 delegates for Republican candidates to grab in their quest to become their party’s nominee; PunditMom Joanne Bamberger says contraception debate could effect results

Today is Super Tuesday, the day voters in 10 states will go to the polls to cast their ballots for which Republican candidate they want to see go up against President Obama in the November general election. With so many delegates up for grabs today — 419, to be exact — Super Tuesday marks a watershed, make-or-break moment for the candidates.

If Mitt Romney wins big across the states today, it could essentially seal his nomination as the GOP candidate. If he doesn’t, it could cause the primary season to drag on even longer.

Related: Super Tuesday Winner Is…

“While many of the polls show that Mitt Romney trails Rick Santorum, I believe Romney will ultimately win the day on Super Tuesday, partly as a result of the current conservative drumbeat against birth control,” PunditMom Founder and blogger Joanne Bamberger, author of Mothers of Intention: How Women & Social Media Are Revolutionizing Politics in America, told genConnect.

Joanne Bamberger

WATCH: Social Media Empowers Women to Get Involved in Politics

“Many Republican women voters will likely stay home from the polls to express their discontent with the remaining presidential choices,” Bamberger continued. “The economy is still the number one issue, but American women know that if they don’t have control over their reproductive decisions, then they lack control over family economic decisions.”

Just how much health insurance should cover female contraception — and the controversy surrounding Rush Limbaugh lambasting Georgetown law student Sandra Fluke — has taken center stage in recent weeks, overshadowing many other issues candidates may like to focus on.  A new federal rule requiring insurance coverage for contraception has sparked outrage among many conservatives and religious groups, and has put the female vote in the spotlight.

Related: Should the Morning After Pill Be Given to Girls Under 17 Without a Prescription?

Santorum has come under fire for statements he has made, such as that he doesn’t believe in birth control. Romney, meanwhile, has been hammered by Democrats for apparently flip-flopping on aspects of the issue.

Santorum’s wife, Karen, said in an interview Tuesday that she takes it personally when her husband’s critics cast him as a social conservative who doesn’t understand modern women. “As a wife, mother, an educated woman, it frustrates me that they try to do that,” she told “CBS This Morning.” She said it’s “unfortunate” that the media tries to “corner” her husband on issues like contraception.

Related: Contraception Shopping: Take It as Seriously as Shoe Shopping

As for the race, Romney is currently ahead of the pack of Republican contenders – which includes Santorum, Newt Gingrich, and Ron Paul – with 187 delegates. Delegates up for grabs on Super Tuesday are more than a-third of the total needed to win the Republican nod. Ohio will be a particularly tough battle, with a whopping 63 delegates up for the taking.

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Category: Lifestyle, Politics, Views on the News

Joanne Bamberger

About Joanne Bamberger: Joanne Bamberger is a political and media strategist/analyst, author, and recovering attorney living in the shadow of the nation’s capital. She’s also known around the blogosphere as PunditMom! Look for her just-published book — PunditMom's [...]
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