Addyi: Viagra for Women

[ 0 ] January 19, 2016 |

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Did you know there are 26 drugs that help men with their sexual function, and up until this past August, there were none for women! The FDA has finally approved the first drug for the most common cause of women’s sexual dysfunction, low or absent sexual desire. The media refers to this new drug, Addyi, as “Pink Viagra,” but it’s actually quite different from Viagra.

Addyi is a non-hormonal pill that works to restore balance to key chemicals in the brain involved in the sexual desire response in women. It will “restore” sex drive in a woman who once had, but later lost her desire. It is not for someone who never had the desire to begin with, and also will not increase it in a woman who has normal desire. In other words, it is not a “sex pill”. Addyi is indicated for loss of desire not caused by other factors, such as use of anti-depressants, problems with their relationship, or hormonal problems. While a man takes Viagra only when he is going to have sex in order to help him achieve and maintain an erection, Addyi works in a woman’s main sex organ, her brain, and needs to be taken every night, like a regular medication. Addyi is taken at bedtime because it can make you sleepy. Other possible side effects include dizziness and nausea, which are infrequent after being on the drug for a few weeks.

If you take Addyi and it doesn’t work for you after 8 weeks, it’s probably not going to work, so you can stop taking it. The majority of women in the studies who responded to the drug, however, showed an increase in satisfying sexual events (SSEs) of 6-8 per month compared to women on placebo! And they wanted to have those sexual events, as opposed to doing it just to keep their partner happy.

Women’s sexual medicine specialist and gynecologist, Dr. Alan Altman spoke with genConnect about his support for the new drug, “Addyi is not for everyone, and there are other therapies that have been used successfully for this problem over the years, like couples counseling, sex therapy, hormonal therapies, midfullness training, etc. But, most important, it will now open the conversation about sexual function in women and have a positive impact on millions of women suffering from low or absent sex drive.” Addyi won’t take away from the therapy but it can add another dimension of what doctors can offer their patients.

Pink pillFor now there is still a very strict regulation on who can take and prescribe Addyi, both the doctor or healthcare practitioner who prescribes it, and the pharmacist who dispenses it have to be “certified” before they can help their patients decide to use it, but that shouldn’t stop women from starting a conversation with their doctor and seeing if Addyi may be right for them.

To find out more about Dr. Alan Altman and about Addyi, check out his website.

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Category: Health, Women's Health

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About Dr. Alan Altman: Perimenopause, post menopause, natural hormonal therapy and women's sexual function and dysfunction specialist Dr. Altman graduated from the University of Pennsylvania, received his MD degree from the New York University School of Medicine, and then [...]
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